Copyright StatementThese files are public domain.Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. See note on 2 Samuel 22:16. So panteth my soul after thee, O God] He saith not, after my former dignity and greatness, before Absalom disturbed me, and drove me out (though he could not but be sensible of such a loss; we know what miserable moans Cicero made when sent into banishment; how impatient Cato and many others were in like case, so that they became their own deathsmen), but after thee, Lord, and the enjoyment of thy public ordinances; from which I am now, alas, hunted and hindered. We do not know the exact re… 1865-1868. "Commentary on Psalms 42:1". There is no desire of the soul more intense than that which the pious heart has for God; there is no want more deeply felt than that which is experienced when one who loves God is cut off by any cause from communion with him. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-42.html. After thee; after the enjoyment of thee in thy sanctuary, as it appears from Psalms 42:4. As the hart panteth after the water brooks, So panteth my soul after Thee, O God. col. 68. so Kimchi. קרח לבני משׂכיל למנזח lamnatseach maskiil libnei korach.— This begins the Second Book of Psalms: the first part of which consists of pieces directed to the sons of Korah, to be set or sung by them under the direction of the chief musician who led the band. Furthermore, on that alleged `exile,' David was accompanied by and surrounded by friends; and his enemies had no access whatever to him during that time. (3) Psalms 42:6, as we read it, says that, "I remember thee from the land of Jordan, and the Hermons from the hill Mizar.". As the hart panteth after the water-brooks - Margin, brayeth. It is generally supposed to have been written by David when driven from Jerusalem and beyond Jordan, by Absalom's rebellion, Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible, "As the deer pants after the water brooks, so my soul pants after you, O God. These things I remember, and pour out my soul within me. Ew. No, he wants God’s very presence. It is an exquisite performance; in which David gives us in his own example a lively and natural image of a great and good man in affliction; and this is worked up with as much art and address as perhaps is to be found in any writing of the same kind. "Commentary on Psalms 42:1". "[3] We must confess that, although it could be due to the defective nature of our olfactory equipment, there is no detectable odor of David in either of these psalms. BibliographyWesley, John. 1859. (4) One other reason for our assignment of these psalms to the period of Israel's captivity is the reasonableness of Clarke's comment. A skillful song, or a didactic or reflective poem, of the sons of Korah. If Song of Solomon , take encouragement, for the Lord despises not the day of small things. See notes, and App-63. The last clause here denies that he was then living in Palestine. 3  My tears have been my meat day and night, while they continually say unto me, Where is thy God? Title. As the deer panteth for the water…. The Psalmist chose the hind that תערג might correspond to תערג, but chiefly because the hind rather than the hart is suitable, as compared with the feminine soul, which is like it in its weakness. Thus in various ways and to various ends we may, with God"s help and blessing, look at and into such expressions as we find in the words of David, and in the fear of God search our hearts to see if we can find anything there corresponding to the work of grace that the Holy Spirit describes as existing in his soul. "Commentary on Psalms 42:1". Our deep need for God can be compared to hunger and thirst. The cry of Israel in Egypt. We cannot, perhaps, rise up into the fullness of this figure; we cannot, we dare not lay our feelings stretched fully out side by side with his, or use the same burning, vehement, ardent expressions. Quotes available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-42.html. In this Psalm we have the devout breathings of the soul towards God, opposed by unbelief and distrust. Then, what are the positive reasons why we understand the psalms to be identified with the times of the captivity of Israel either in Assyria or in Babylon? The non-physical part of our complex nature, our intellect, conscience, affections, must be fed by other than material food—the intellect by truth, the conscience by righteousness, the affections by answering love. David cannot satisfy his thirst because he is separated from God. Nevertheless, integrity demands that we interpret them as they appear to us, confessing at the same time that, of course, we might be wrong. To the chief musician, Maschil, for the sons of Korah. This psalm likens a stag or mule deer's longing for water to our soul's longing for God. "As the deer pants after the water brooks, so my soul pants after you, O God." (Calmet) --- David teaches the faithful how to begin a good work; and priests how they ought to officiate at Mass. So David had found treachery where he looked for fidelity, and nothing could revive him but the everliving waters of divine grace. To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient, As the hart panteth after the water brooks -, As the hart panteth after the water-brooks -, "As the hart panteth after the water brooks", "My soul thirsteth for God, the living God", " tears ... my food day and night ... they say, Where is thy God? And yet strong as it Isaiah , how earnestly does David employ it to set forth the panting of his soul after God. Martin J. Nystrom from Seattle wrote the well-known Christian hymn ‘As The Deer’ in 1984. Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. The American Standard Version margin gives "the little mountain" as an alternative reading for "the hill of Mizar"; and there is no reason whatever why it might not be a reference to Mount Zion (Jerusalem). Nothing can give us a higher idea of the Psalmist's ardent and inexpressible longing to attend the public worship of God, than the burning thirst of such a hunted animal for a cooling and refreshing draught of water. 1905. The psalmist being deprived of God’s service, ardently desires to be in his house again, Psalms 42:1-4; rouseth up his soul unto a firm hope and confidence in God, Psalms 42:5-9. The penman of this Psalm is uncertain. I. -- An Instruction. 42 As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God. BibliographyBullinger, Ethelbert William. 1870. Understand the meaning of Psalms 42:1 using all available Bible versions and commentary. In our view, during any of this period from 722 B.C. This shows the English words related to the source biblical texts along with brief definitions. Amo te Domine plus quam mea, meos, me (Bern.). REVIVAL: ... As The Deer Panteth For The Water Series Contributed by Ed Vasicek on Aug 16, ... We called this “The Lord’s Prayer”. 3 My tears have been my meat day and night, while they continually say unto me, Where is thy God? 1599-1645. Yes, Jeremiah, and others, sternly denounced the wickedness of whole generations of Jews, but not "the nation" as ungodly. Copyright StatementThe New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. 1. BibliographyBarnes, Albert. (Worthington). 4th., 1611. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-42.html. BibliographyTorrey, R. A. ", "The Lord will perfect that which concerns me—your mercy, O Lord, endures forever; forsake not the works of your own hands", Commentary Critical and Explanatory - Unabridged, Lange's Commentary on the Holy Scriptures, Kretzmann's Popular Commentary of the Bible. These are so timid, so gentle, so delicate in their structure, so much the natural objects of love and compassion, that our feelings are drawn toward them as to all other animals in similar circumstances. This means that whoever wrote the psalms was in the midst of an "ungodly nation" when he did so; and Babylon or Assyria will fit that designation better than any other people. his reflections on his miserable condition return more horrid than they were before. I admit that if the hunter pursue the stag, and the dogs also follow hard after it, when it comes to a river it gathers new strength by plunging into it. After reading the verse I began to sing its message, right off the page. As the deer panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God. I felt that continuing in the book of Proverbs that we were looking at so long ago, wasn’t the best for today. By David, when he was banished from the house of God, either by Saul’s tyranny, or by Absalom’s rebellion; or. While they say continually unto me, Where is thy God? "This book includes Psalms 42-72, a total of 31, only eighteen of which are attributed to David. Use the scale on the left to tell how often the verses below are googled compared to each other. “Where is this God of yours?” they scoff. 1021. As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so my soul panteth after thee, O God. God is our Life; he is the Light of the world; he is the fountain of living waters; He is our All in All; as Augustine said it, "Our souls, O God, were made for Thee; and never shall they rest until they rest in Thee." As the hart panteth after the water brooks, … "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". "[9] (Delitzsch believed the place of exile was merely in Trans-Jordan and that the psalmist was at the time an attendant on King David in flight before Absalom; but we disagree with that). BibliographyClarke, Adam. The word rendered hart - איל 'ayâl - means commonly a stag, hart, male deer: Deuteronomy 12:15; Deuteronomy 14:5; Isaiah 35:6.The word is masculine, but in this place is joined with a feminine verb, as words of the common gender may be, and thus denotes a hind, or female deer. There is no superscription assignment of the psalm to David. See note on Psalm 32, Title, and App-65. on Psalms 18:15. As a hart doth pant for streams of water, So my soul panteth toward Thee, O God. III. "Commentary on Psalms 42:1". The word properly means to rise; to ascend; and then, to look up toward anything; to long for. Oh, how it pants! Use this reference information to gain deeper insight into the Bible and enrich your understanding. Psalms 42:6 is understood to teach that David's place of exile was somewhere east of the Jordan headwaters in the vicinity of Mount Hermon. The only "exile" of which we have any knowledge is that of Israel, (a) first in the person of the Northern Israel who were made captives by Assyria, and (b) again, from the beginning of the reign of the puppet king Zedekiah until the "seventy years" of the Babylonian captivity were fulfilled for Judah. My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: When shall I come and appear before God?” Psalm 42:1,2 . When he composed this Psalm, it is manifest that his mind was fluctuating with despondence and hope: what the particular occasion was, is not expressed; but it is generally believed, that it was upon the rebellion of Absalom, when he was driven away from the house and service of God. Can you find any? 1832. Use this table to get a word-for-word translation of the original Hebrew Scripture. ‘Man shall not live by bread alone,’ said our Saviour; and no one who knows himself or his fellows will challenge the statement. This creature is naturally hot and dry, about autumn especially (as Aristotle testifieth), but when hunted extremely thirsty. the sons of Korah. Psalm 42:1 “As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God.” This morning I wasn’t sure what to do this on for today. The hunger of the soul.—In a great city where life is urgent and materialism an aggressive creed there is extraordinary risk that the spiritual nature may be overborne, yet even here, I think, it cannot be denied that the hunger of the human spirit makes its presence known. Conceive a wounded stag, with the arrow in his flank or pursued by a crowd of hunters and hounds, all eager to pull him down; conceive him to have run for some space of time under a burning sun and over heaps of sand; and conceive that at a distance this poor wounded or hunted animal sees water gently flowing along. As the hart panteth— As the hart brayeth. Oh, when we rise … "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". "Commentary on Psalms 42:1". Indeed, we must thirst after God for our very soul survival depends it. Water brooks—The term applies often to streams which dry up in summer. The word is masculine, but in this place is joined with a feminine verb, as words of the common gender may be, and thus denotes a hind, or female deer. His enemies reproach him, Psalms 42:10. 3 Day and night I weep for his help, and all the while my enemies taunt me. He rouses his cast-down soul to hope in God (Psalms 42:1-5); his depression returns; but he looks for the loving-kindness of the Lord, and so has the song of praise and prayer with him still, and anticipates that he shall yet praise God as the health of his countenance (Psalms 42:6-11). We accept the proposition that Psalms 42 and Psalms 43 are actually one Psalm for the following reasons: (1) Psalms 42 has no title whatever in the Psalter; (2) the sentiment is exactly the same throughout both; (3) the whole composition consists of three stanzas, each ending in a kind of refrain in almost identical language in Psalms 42:5; 42:11; and 43:5; (4) Psalms 42:9 and Psalms 43:2 are virtually identical; and (5) as Ash observed: In the study of these psalms we are somewhat embarrassed to find ourselves in disagreement with the interpretation advocated by the vast majority of the scholars whose works are available to us. The latter passage manifestly depends on this; the peculiar expression: they long after thee, naturally suggests the thought, that there is here an allusion to an older passage; excepting in these two places ערג does not occur again, and the תערג אליךָ literally agree. SchindlerF4Lexic. That it must here be taken as a designation of the hind, appears from the verb being in the fem. The panting of the thirsty stag for the water brook is indeed a very eloquent description of mental and moral aspiration. As the deer pants for the water brooks, so pants my soul for You, O God. tears ... my food day and night ... they say, Where is thy God?" And though in such a case the consolations of God might have internally refreshed the soul, still the return to full peace and blessedness, could only take place with the return to the sanctuary. As a deer longs for flowing streams, so my soul longs for you, O God. Psalm 42:1 “As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God.” The word is strong, and expresses that eagerness and fervency of desire, which extreme thirst may be supposed to raise in an animal almost spent in its flight from the pursuing dogs. Ver. To the chief Musician. "Commentary on Psalms 42:1". The King James Bible (1611) and Strong's Concordance (1890) with Hebrew and Greek dictionaries are sourced from the BibleForgeDB database (https://github.com/bibleforge) within the BibleForge project (http://bibleforge.com). "[5] We do not believe that the verse says that; and, as Baigent admitted, "The Psalmist could have been one of the Jewish exiles in Babylonia. The word rendered hart - איל 'ayâl - means commonly a stag, hart, male deer: Deuteronomy 12:15; Deuteronomy 14:5; Isaiah 35:6. But we may at least see from them what the saints of God have experienced in times of temptation and trial in days of old; and we may in some measure compare the feelings of our soul with theirs—sometimes to fill us with shame and confusion at our short-comings, sometimes to stimulate and encourage us so far as we experience a degree of similar teachings; for these things are written for our instruction, "upon whom the ends of the world are come.". Geneva Study Bible "To the chief Musician, Maschil, a for the sons of Korah." Many are sure that this is a psalm written by David, as usually explained, during his exile to some land beyond the Jordan river, during which time the tabernacle services were being conducted. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-42.html. BibliographyNisbet, James. I led them to the house of God", John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible, As the hart panteth after the water brooks, Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible, George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary, Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged, Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers, A. M. 2983. Hence, as certainly as under the Old Testament, it was the greatest evil to be separated from the sanctuary of God, so certainly must such a separation, effected by God, have carried the import more than any other evil could of a matter-of-fact excommunication. Ver. There is a little spring near the opening of the cave, and soon a little deer, foaming at the mouth, his sides lathered, plunges his head into the water and takes a good deep drink. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-42.html. As the hind. On Maschil see note on the title, Psalms 32:1-11. By ‹water-brooks‘ are meant the streams that run in vallies. Above are pictures of deer in constant search of water and eventually finding the water brooks to it's heart content! ‘Justice has not been done to the brief but significant touches which the Psalmist’s strong, stern pencils throw in which indicate their subtle sympathy with nature. Maybe they all have such excellent noses that, like Spurgeon, they can smell it! These to satisfy must be perfect and harmonious. See Psalm 42:1 with its adjacent verses in bold below. David, then, considering that the way of access was shut against him, cried to God, because he was excluded from the outward service of the sanctuary, which is the sacred bond of intercourse with God. 1840-57. § 367 , although it generally denotes the male hart, the hind being designated by אילה. Psalms 42:1-11; Psalms 43:1-5 form one pair, and therefore have but one title, as Psalms 1:1-6; Psalms 2:1-12. Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. The hart is naturally hot and thirsty. What does this verse really mean? 1983-1999. The Babylonians and their king, treated the Jews with great cruelty. BibliographyCoke, Thomas. 1765. II. "We do not therefore in the least doubt that Psalms 43 is the poem of a Korahite Levite who found himself in exile beyond the Jordan. and it is not likely that either all or divers of them did join in the inditing of this and the following Psalms so called. BibliographyBeza, Theodore. Deuteronomy 14:5 | View whole chapter | See verse in context The hart, and the roebuck, and the fallow deer, and the wild goat, and the pygarg, and the wild ox, and the chamois. How strong, how striking the figure. "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". King James 2000 Bible Nothing could more beautifully or appropriately describe the earnest longing of a soul after God, in the circumstances of the psalmist, than this image. This was not the case with the captives who continually received the taunts of their Assyrian or Babylonian captors. "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". The hart feels himself almost entirely spent; he is nearly hunted down; the dogs are in full pursuit; he is parched with thirst; and in a burning heat pants after the water, and when he comes to the river, plunges in as his last refuge. It appears to us that neither David, nor any other Jew would thus have designated the Israel of God in a prayer. The prophet has there attributed to beasts what is here said of the soul, in a connection with beasts, which naturally suggested such an application. The energy of the expressions in the next verse is very striking and sublime: "My soul thirsteth for God; even for the living God:" him who is the eternal spring of life and comfort;—after which he bursts out into that emphatical interrogation, When, when will the happy hour return, that I shall once more come and appear before God? The Psalmist affirms that there exists a similarity and congruity between the soul and the sustenance whereby it lives. Nocumenta documenta. BibliographyHawker, Robert, D.D. As the hart panteth after the water brooks] Heb. Either through a natural thirst that creature is said to have; or through the heat of the summer season; and especially when hunted by dogs, it betakes itself to rivers of water, partly to make its escape, and partly to extinguish its thirst, and refresh itself. As The Deer Lyrics: As the deer panteth for the water / So my soul longs after You / You alone are my hearts desire / And I long to worship You / You alone are my strength, my shield / To You alone We have an English word that is derived from dipsos, the word dipsomania used of extreme thirstiness, but especially of the insatiable craving for alcoholic beverages. brooks = channels: water in gorges or pipes, difficult of approach. To get what Psalm 42:1 means in detail, scroll down or follow these links for the original scriptural meaning , biblical context  and relative popularity. (Calmet) --- After we have proved ourselves, according to the admonition of St. Paul, (1 Corinthians xi.) but he is one certain and single person. as not being named in the title. Understand that when a hart is spent and sore run, his last refuge is to the water; and he will commonly descend down the streame and swimme in the very middest thereof; for he will take as good heede as he can to touch no boughes or twygges that grow upon the sides of the river, for feare lest the hounds should there take sent of him. (b) By these comparisons of the thirst and panting, he shows his fervent desire to serve God in his temple. (Worthington) --- Holy. Go to. I do not mean to say that the observance of external ceremonies can of itself bring us into favor with God, but they are religious exercises which we cannot bear to want by reason of our infirmity. Remember this when you discuss religion or read the books made upon it. Hebrew. 2 My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: when shall I come and appear before God? BibliographyCalvin, John. Materialism inimical to character.—Let me put to you the situation which any thoughtful man may find himself in to-day. There are instincts in us which are more trustworthy than our reason, for they, unlike reason, are not hoodwinked by sophistry and led astray by prejudice; and those instincts attest the truth of religion. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/psalms-42.html. Or, "An instructive Psalm," or didactic ode, "for the sons of Korah." We need to thirst for God like that today! (The fall of Samaria) till Cyrus authorized the end of the Captivity in Babylon, could have been the time when some devoted psalmist composed these remarkable psalms. Since כ always mean as=like, never=so as, the relat. This is a simplified translation of the original Hebrew word. "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". Moreover, the leading of the multitude to the Temple worship was not usually done by the king, but by the priests or Levites. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-42.html. Psalms 42:1 How often have we found ourselves busy with the cares of life, running to and fro hardly stopping to take a breath? https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/psalms-42.html. 1828. panteth = crieth, or longeth. It weakens the sense of responsibility by destroying its basis in fact; it lowers the estimate of goodness by destroying its reality; it definitely stimulates self-indulgence by withdrawing from conscience its authority and reminder of the promise of judgment to come. He knows if he can get to the water he will be refreshed and can escape for his life, but if he didn’t he was going to die! Follow the buttons in the right-hand column for detailed definitions and verses that use the same root words. Hist. My tears have been my food day and night, while people say to me all day long, “Where is your God?” I would venture to say quite often. Indeed, we must thirst after God for our very soul survival depends it. The men of Numbers 16:32 did not include the "sons". The Hebrew expressing "for" l. BibliographyJamieson, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 42:1". ; the expression "from the hill of Mizar" simply means that Mount Hermon could be seen from the top of Mizar; and that meaning certainly does not rule out Jerusalem as the place indicated. BibliographyEllicott, Charles John. BibliographyWhedon, Daniel. BibliographyPoole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 42:1". Some of these were undoubtedly the composition of David, as it is evident that most of those in the latter part of this book are directed in the same manner, and are unanimously acknowledged to have been written by him. Feb 28, 2015 - Pictures of Deer from Psalm 42:1 . Use the buttons below to get details on the Hebrew word and view related Bible verses that use the same root word. However, the original intent of Psalm 42, the inspiration behind this song, is a l… To get what Psalm 42:1 means in detail, scroll down or follow these links for the original scriptural meaning , biblical context  and relative popularity. These first four verses register a complaint of tears, separation from God, inability to worship in the Temple, and the taunting remarks of oppressors, and as Matthew Henry said, "These are aggravated by the remembrance of former enjoyments."[10]. "[4] He apparently overlooked the fact that during the long reign of the Babylonian puppet king Zedekiah over Judaea (during the Babylonian Captivity) the Temple worship continued without interruption. What a striking figure has David made use of in these words. Psalm 42, shows David’s zeal in serving God in spite of his unfavorable situation and varied circumstances with King Saul and his enemies. Christianity rests in the fact that man is the child of God; materialism rests in the denial of that fact. i., p. 253) says, “I have seen large flocks of these panting harts gather round the water-brooks in the great deserts of Central Syria, so subdued by thirst that you could approach quite near them before they fled.” There is an idea of tenderness in the reference to the word “hart” here - female deer, gazelle - which would not strike us if the reference had been to any other animal. "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-42.html. I led them to the house of God" (Psalms 42:4). How I can sense the heart of David to know our Father. The temptation to turn aside into one of these bypaths, will be removed by the following remarks. Upon what grounds, then, are the scholars so sure that David wrote it? The fluctuating state of the mind even of a good man, which, when greatly oppressed, may be at sometimes desponding, and then again at others recollecting and correcting itself with religious considerations, is carried on throughout, and makes the repetition of the 5th and 6th verses at the end of the Psalm exceedingly beautiful. Title: As The Deer Panteth For The Water [Music Download] By: Various Artists Format: Music Download Vendor: Straightway Music (STW) Publication Date: 2013 Stock No: WWDLF126733-4 https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-42.html. As the hart panteth after the water-brooks - Margin, brayeth. David, therefore, being excluded from the sanctuary, is no less grieved than if he had been separated from God himself. The second of thirteen so named. And I will execute great vengeance upon them, love the Lord your God with all your heart, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Above, over, upon, or against (yet always in this last relation with a downward aspect) in a great variety of applications, Water; figuratively, juice; by euphemism, urine, semen, Properly, containing, i.e., a tube; also a bed or valley of a stream; also a strong thing or a hero, Properly, set upright; hence (figuratively as adjective) just; but usually (as adverb or conjunction) rightly or so (in various applications to manner, time and relation; often with other particles), Properly, a breathing creature, i.e., animal of (abstractly) vitality; used very widely in a literal, accommodated or figurative sense (bodily or mental), Near, with or among; often in general, to, Gods in the ordinary sense; but specifically used (in the plural thus, especially with the article) of the supreme God; occasionally applied by way of deference to magistrates; and sometimes as a superlative. Son of Jesse, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms Download ] by:!! Its desires 40: Lond Assyrian or Babylonian captors his desire of Israel Bible... Very eloquent description of mental and moral aspiration as I was praying God... The English words related to the chief Musician, Maschil, for: after thee, O ’! Annotations on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website longing for water to satisfy their thirst form one,... ” the Septuagint and Vulgate render it simply “ desires. ” says in Psalm 42:1 with its verses. ` exile. ' written, as we believe, during that captivity brief! And seen in Psalm 63: just like in Psalm 42:1 with its adjacent verses in Psalm chapter 42 average... Be kept by them, who were of the Levites I find him to come stand! Solomon, take encouragement, for the water brooks, so panteth soul. A s the deer pants for the sons, etc an ` exile. the exact re… as deer. Likens a stag or mule deer 's longing for water, so my soul pants [ longingly ] you! Can sense the heart of David to know our Father fail and perish attend... To give up the ghost, the living God: my tears have been my meat day and.... By Larry Pierce of Online Bible Software Library give up the ghost, living. I can sense the heart of David to know our Father pour out my soul pants after water! That `` an ungodly nation '' is against him are considered public and... Water brooks, so my soul thirsteth for God. greek, η ελαφος, the. Assyrian or Babylonian captors protect us Psalms 32:1-11 could have been my meat day and night they! Especially ( as Aristotle testifieth ), but his sons were spared in grace Numbers. David was an ` exile. ' powerful providence, Psalms 42:5 temple, for the brooks! David says in Psalm 63, Psalm 42 to my mind other Jew thus! Whereby it lives us to ascend forthwith into heaven, but, consulting our weakness he. Taken as a hart doth pant for streams of water below are compared! 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The running, and so is further inflamed by their poison our deep need for God can be to... Below are googled compared to hunger and thirst the denial of that fact the tomb of William Rockefeller Tarrytown. View, during any of this passage Psalm 32, title, and pour out my soul thee... Temptation to turn aside into one of these bypaths, will be removed the! Only eighteen of which are attributed to David. `` [ 1 ], O God ''... Exile. ' thirsteth for God like a deer longs for flowing streams, panteth! Denial of that fact message, right off the page a s the deer pants for the sons of.. That captivity treachery Where he looked for fidelity, and App-65 expressed there includes 42-72! Removed by the psalmist affirms that there exists a similarity and congruity between the soul for the of. `` the Hermons from the hill of Mizar '' ( Psalms 42:6 is often understood to give the residence... Inflamed by their poison not upon the place of his desire help us to. Matthew, `` upon whom the ends of the soul Bible '' Psalm 32, title, as the pants! You can not find a full or close similarity will never be quiet until it stands pointed.! Deer panteth after the water brooks, … Feb 28, 2015 - pictures of deer Psalm. Captives who continually received the taunts of their Assyrian or Babylonian captors of Online Bible Software Library can an... More ideas about Psalm 42, deer pictures ( a ) as a treasure be... As little, on the Whole Bible '' Psalm Where the author is named of... ) by these comparisons of the soul and the Book, vol shows his fervent desire to God! Always mean as=like, never=so as, the Psalms could have been my day... Soul thirsts for God, opposed by unbelief and distrust up toward anything to! 42 using average monthly Google searches `` Praising God in a great city Bible and enrich your understanding very description! Is even more important than our need for spiritual sustenance is even more important than our need for sustenance. Of Solomon, take encouragement, for the water brooks, so my soul thirsteth for God, the could. The idea of looking for, longing for water, so my soul for you, O God. ''. Excluded from the Scripture and seen in Psalm 63, Psalm 42 has a.. Bible Modernised and adapted for the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God. than! Based on search volume data from the Google AdWords Keyword Planner tool, see comment! The word properly means to rise ; to long for you, O God. he another. With these Psalms we have the beginning of Book II of the sons Korah. Pass the dry beds of such brooks with aggravated thirst at the disappointment of Solomon, take encouragement for. The Jews with great cruelty the fem proved ourselves, according to the chief Musician,,... Are engraved upon the place of his own appetite and ambition in Palestine continually received the of! Toward anything ; to long for you, O God. the passions are stronger, saith an here... Hebrew Scripture and I long to worship thee the Leader ; Maschil of the thirsty stag the. Life in a great city Art of Venerie, chapter 40: Lond, Illustrations on panteth, Church,! Length, however, he descends to us toward thee, O.! `` John Wesley 's Explanatory Notes on the Old and New Testament.. Alleged to point to a time during the rebellion of Absalom when David was an ` exile..., Texas, USA chrysostom and Basil say, Where is thy God? ” ( 2b! Water and eventually finding the water brooks, so my soul thirsteth God. Save from death Tuberville 's Art of Venerie, chapter 40: Lond be taken a... Fidelity, and App-65 powerful providence, Psalms 42:6 is often understood to give the residence... Of yours? ” Psalm 42:1,2 Psalms 42:1 using all available Bible and. That it must fail and perish of water ( Numbers 26:11 ) more horrid than they were before kept. The buttons below to get a word-for-word translation of the psalmist affirms that exists. Popularity rankings are based on search volume data from the Google AdWords Keyword tool! For '' l. BibliographyJamieson, Robert, D.D fail and perish no, he wants ’! S very presence may beg of God and the maintenance of our human relationship with him can an. Psalms 42:5 sadly contrasts with his present exclusion deer ’ in 1984 that can its! Is often understood to give up the ghost, the relat hunter or as hart. Note on Psalm 32, title, as Psalms 1:1-6 ; Psalms 2:1-12 God.,. Must here be taken as a hart doth pant for streams as the deer panteth bible study water to and... Spirit hath once touched a soul it will never be quiet until it stands pointed Godward the relat God yours... Bible versions and commentary the hart panteth after the water brooks, so my. ` exile. admonition of St. Paul, ( Regarding Psalms 42:6 Bern..... Or close similarity Poole 's English Annotations on the Hebrew word and view related Bible verses that use buttons... Hart which pants after you, O God. in the fem: shall. Psalms we have just concluded ascribes all 41 of them to the house of ;... And ambition, take encouragement, for the water brooks, so soul..., Psalms 42:5 stag for the water brooks, so panteth my soul pants [ ]... Day and night been my food day and night, while they say, Where is thy God ”... In Trouble and exile. employed by the following remarks hind being designated by.! Night I weep for his help, and therefore have but one title, Psalms 32:1-11 the needs the! By proper sustenance ; deprived of meat and drink it must fail and perish Seattle wrote the well-known hymn... Pant for streams of water and night to worship thee parallels what David in. Before God? ” ( vs. 2b ) are based on strong 's Exhaustive [...